Tag Archives: app development

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Transcript for the 6/29/14 #storyappchat

Transcript for the 6/29/14 #storyappchat

Transcript for the June 29, 2014 edition of #storyappchat, our weekly Twitter gathering where we discuss all things related to creating storybook apps for kids. Tonight we talked about Handling Disappointment: How to Stay Positive and Motivated. Join us every Sunday at 9 PM ET/6 PM PT!

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Open Mic Night for #storyappchat THIS Sunday, July 21, 2013

Plan to drop by the weekly #storyappchat this coming Sunday [July 21] at 9 p.m. Eastern (6 p.m. Pacific) for Open Mic Night. That’s right–the topic or topics are up to YOU. The possibilities are endless:

  • Writers and illustrators: ask the developers about the ins and outs of getting your story built into an app or ebook
  • Story app developers and story app service providers: meet and get to know talented digital artists and writers; find out what your users like and don’t like about your apps
  • Moms, dads, teachers and caregivers: find out about new apps for your kids, and discover how they were created

Since you can create your own topic during the chat hour, there’s no reason why we won’t be seeing YOU this Sunday night at 6 pm PT/ 9 pm ET. Use the #storyappchat hashtag, and tweet away!

P.S. Try using our new #TWUBS account, http://twubs.com/storyappchat and follow @storyappchat for resources, transcripts and updates!

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Transcript for the 7/14/13 #storyappchat: Sponsored Apps

Transcript for the 7/14/13 #storyappchat: Sponsored Apps

Here is the transcript for the July 14, 2013 #storyappchat, a very lively discussion on a rather controversial topic, which was “Sponsored Apps: Finding the Right Balance.” Enjoy and we’ll see you next week!

Topic for the 7/14/13 #storyappchat: Sponsored Apps

#storyappchat topic badgeNobody likes ads in their apps, right? Well, it depends. Sometimes unobtrusive ads are OK if it means we get the app for free. And the placement and handling of the ad(s) or product mention(s) make a huge difference. A simple welcome screen including the words “sponsored by” and a company name is a lot more palatable than rotating pop-up ads that insist you view them before moving on in the app.

As creators of storybook apps for kids, we need to be very careful how we incorporate ads in our products, if at all. In fact, a recent update for a book app  that customers had already paid for included new ads, and users were presented with the option to pay again in order to remove the ads. This was an unfortunate decision, especially in an app designed for children featuring trusted, popular characters. There are ways to monetize content without making people feel as though they’re getting ripped off.

On the other hand, if done tastefully and unobtrusively, a sponsorship could make the difference between an app or ebook getting made or not. Perhaps more companies with deep pockets will be willing in the future to pay to sponsor our work, in exchange for a mention and website link. This could be placed on a “For Parents” page in an electronic story, so as not to interfere with the reading experience for a youngster.

Let’s talk about the pros and cons of introducing sponsors and other paid content in apps and ebooks during the next #storyappchat, this Sunday (July 14) at 9:00 p.m. Eastern/6:00 p.m. Pacific. Just start tweeting using the #storyappchat hashtag to take part!

Last Week’s Transcript: on Monday morning I tweeted a link to the 7/7/13 transcript (Selling in Non-U.S. Markets), but if you missed it, the link is here. Follow us on Twitter to get all the latest updates!

Topic for the 6/30/13 #storyappchat: Critique Groups

#storyappchat topic badgeI studied industrial design in college, and one of the most memorable components of the course material was the critique. Led by the instructor, we’d engage in a whole-class discussion of every piece created by the students for the latest assignment, and I remember going into most of these with a certain amount of dread. I’d heard stories about professors who’d pull work off the wall and silently (and dismissively) let it fall to the floor.

Luckily, I had mostly caring instructors who doled out constructive criticism, but the fear surrounding those critique sessions remains planted in my memory.

Today’s critique groups don’t work like that, thankfully. A critique group is a carefully chosen group of supportive artists and/or writers who are working on projects in the same genre you are. The idea is that everyone in the group both shares current projects with the other members, and provides constructive criticism on everyone else’s work. There should be lots of give and take, and members are expected to stay current on the state of the publishing world so realistic options can be kept in mind and discussed. After all, we all want to reach our target audiences with our work, right?

Critique groups can meet in person on a set schedule, or online in a forum or other web venue. There is no right way to create or maintain a critique group, but certain best practices can help keep members focused on helping everyone in the group achieve success.

Let’s discuss the topic of critique groups during the next #storyappchat, set for this Sunday (June 30) at 9:00 p.m. Eastern/6:00 p.m. Pacific time. Just begin tweeting using the #storyappchat hashtag to take part!

Transcript for the 6/23/13 #storyappchat: Screen Time vs. Screen Quality

[#storyappchat Transcript for 062313]

The transcript follies continue, since SearchHash, the free transcript-generator I’ve been using for the past several months is now down. I put this transcript together using Storify, and hopefully this service will a) serve our purposes and b) not disappear in a few months, just as I’m getting used to it. Also, please bear with me–there may be some bumps in the road as I try to capture all our tweets from the chat, in chronological order. Storify requires me to drag each tweet to a different window, which opens up the real possibility of human error in the process. UGH!

Transcript frustrations aside, this was a solid chat with good links and opinions flying back and forth. If you missed it, go ahead now and make plans to join us for the next one on June 30 at 9:00 p.m. Eastern/6:00 p.m. Pacific, OK?

Topic for the 6/23/13 #storyappchat: Screen Time vs. Screen Quality

#storyappchat topic badgeNo doubt about it, our kids are spending more time in front of screens–and there is some concern about whether or not this is a good thing. But isn’t it time we make a distinction between passive screen time (i.e., television) and active screen time, like engaging with book apps and other educational material on a tablet device?

Carisa wrote about this very topic a few weeks ago on her blog, and it’s worth a look. She reminds us that not all television is bad, and perhaps we should be focusing on the quality of the media we’re consuming (and who we consume it with), instead of the amount of time spent in front of the screen(s).

Let’s discuss the latest research and opinions and what these might mean for content creators, developers and others involved in creating stories for children during the next #storyappchat. We’ll kick things off this Sunday evening, June 23, at 9:00 p.m. Eastern/6:00 p.m. Pacific. Join us! Simply start tweeting using the #storyappchat hashtag–we’ll leave the light on for you.